When humans interfere with nature

As part of my Christmas at the Dairy post I mentioned we made the choice of interfering with nature by choosing to artificially hatch out a clutch of eggs two of our chooks decided they were no longer going to sit on after the first four chickens were born

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New life – Four healthy chickens and 17 eggs still to hatch out ( Hen on the left is a Peking and hen on the right is a Silky)

Broody chooks will not only sit on their own eggs but also tend to gather other chooks eggs over the next 21 days. So when the original clutch of eggs hatch the chooks have to make the decision to look after the live ones or continue to sit on the remaining eggs until they hatch and hope the live ones can look after themselves.

Not surprisingly they chose life over potential life – sounds pragmatic to me

However humans have the capacity to help them do both and being big softies Michael and I chose this option.

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Chicken eggs in incubator 

Its pretty simple to do and very rewarding bringing new chickens into the world

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Once they hatch they stay 24 hours in the incubator and then we move them to their next home

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We use a plastic container like this and cover the bottom with pine shavings or in this case rice hulls

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We supply them with fresh water and chick starter

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and a light to keep them warm

Then we have to make the big decision as to when is the best time to give them back to their mums

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By this time you are getting pretty attached and you tend to keep putting it off and putting it off

So by now the 2nd batch ( they are still hatching) are almost two weeks old and it was now or never

So we decided to put the first 5 out on dusk just as mothers and the chickens they were looking after had gone to bed.

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We were very excited as you can see we managed to tuck “our” chickens under their mums with their brothers and sisters (B&S)

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But it was a different thing next morning. The mums and B&S went off and did their own thing and left “our” chickens to their own devices.

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But we are so proud of our offspring. They are resilient little champions. They have embraced the “chook palace” like they were born there.  

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Our cows are just fascinated by chooks

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They have figured out how to get fed

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and watered

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They have gone on some big adventures

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Climbed a rock face

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In the meantime they are are not being completely ignored by their mothers and B&S who have walked by many times.

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and are now staying very close by

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With the silky chook keeping a very close eye on their activities. Tomorrow is another day and I wouldn’t be surprised if this silky chook has new family 

 

In the meantime another chicken has hatched in the incubator !!!!!!

The humans should get their act together and collect the eggs more regularly and  we wouldn’t need to play mums to other animal’s children would we??

4 thoughts on “When humans interfere with nature

  1. Hi Lynne. I met a guy that has a franchise incubating chickens and takes them to childcare places but he said the nicest response was from nursing homes. Sad and nice at the same time i believe. I am going to approach him to keep the chooks for a chook tractor in the paddocks. Big restaurants in Sydney want to bring vegie scraps down and compost them and feed to chickens as well as do a permaculture plot for vegies and take chicken meat and eggs back. I will use compost on paddocks and complete the loop for the people that use my products. The project of 2012!!

  2. Ahhh John Fairley and Country Valley always something new and innovative on the horizon. You will now be the Australian dairy industry’s answer to Joseph Salatin and the dairy farm of many faces

    • Only just discovered Joe Salatin and have read every blog I could find. Has some great views about business and marketing and all sorts of things. Just love the way he looks at the world. His views on the American equivelant of Safefoods was enlightening. I have not got around to buying his book which i must do.

      • By the way, thanks for the compliment but I am nowhere in the league of Salatin,

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