My plea to Michelle Bridges

The Art4Agriculture team of Young Farming Champions recently responded to the uproar in the agriculture sector that was generated by Michelle Bridges comments on the so called ‘ag gag’ laws and I was very proud of them. I was proud of them because they didn’t attack Michelle, they are just proud of their farms and they love to tell the world that they are proud to farm.   Michelle is perfectly within her rights to respond to the wider sector uproar  with this comment

Ms Bridges defended her column, posting this on Facebook days later:

“Aussie farmers – I have huge respect for what you do and realise the majority of the industry do the right thing. But I do believe that those who don’t should be held accountable.

“My article takes a stance against proposed new laws that I believe are unjust. It does not condone, encourage or endorse illegal activity.”

The long-term goal of reducing poverty, religious fundamentalism and overpopulation will be impossible to reach until we free women around the world from the enslavement of ignorance. More fundamental is the fact that education is a basic human right that has been systematically denied too many women for too long.”

I also agree with Cotton Farmer Bess OConnor who wrote on her Facebook page

AG-GAG.
This is a term I wish everyone (including our farmers and politicians) would stop parroting. It is a phrase that has been coined by terrorists (who call themselves animal libertarians) who are using it to help mislead the public in their push for a legal loophole allowing for exception for a particular form of discrimination and illegal activity.
The laws the current government are looking to implement are not about animal welfare cover ups nor are they about ‘special treatment’ for farmers, in fact the absolute opposite is true.
The laws are actually about securing and safeguarding the rights of farmers as individuals and business owners, just as those rights exist for all other people in this country.
For instance if someone broke into your house and set up surveillance to make sure you were being a ‘good parent’, or if a person did the same at your place of work to make sure you weren’t ‘slacking off’ would you be comfortable with that?
The cold, hard, raw fact is that here in Australia we have a fantastic human rights record. We advocate and do our best to ensure that the law and the judicial process are just and fair in order to secure a fair go and equality for all Australians.
If we continue down this path where we say “Oh yes, you may illegally enter this business (or this home) so long as you are there to collect footage that might uncover a possible item of interest”, don’t for a second think that this dismissal and sidestep of privacy laws won’t then in turn be used to alter laws in other areas too.

And this equally important comment from Sam Collier who is the bright mind behind the Australian Agriculture initiative and Bess’ reply

Bess O'Connor and Sam Collier

What Michelle and most people ossibly doesn’t know is that over 60% of the cruelty cases report to the RSPCA are for domestic pet abuse and that most prosecutions relate to what RSPCA refer to as animal hoarders. That is people who see themselves as “rescuers” of animals which in the main means people who ‘collect’ animals like cats and dogs and retired greyhounds and trotters in flabbergasting numbers and have no capacity to feed or house them?

What saddens me most is celebrities like Michelle speak and people listen. I just wish that they could see the big picture beyond “cute and cuddly’ and speak up and fight for the human causes. Of course animals are important but until people stop treating people baldy how we can expect them to treat animals well

Here is the cause if I would fight for if I  had the reach of people like Michelle

How Women can Save the Planet.

The long-term goal of reducing poverty, religious fundamentalism and overpopulation will be impossible to reach until we free women around the world from the enslavement of ignorance. More fundamental is the fact that education is a basic human right that has been systematically denied too many women for too long. Source

Sadly it isn’t ‘cute and cuddly’ and never will be but I will defy anyone to tell me there is a more important cause

Educate women

How proud would I be if I was a woman of influence and could could help make this happen

The gate is open, Michelle

Today’s post comes from the heart and is a reprint of this article in The Land

Tom Tourle is one of a group of young farmers extending an invitation to Michelle Bridges:

Tom Tourle is one of a group of young farmers extending an invitation to Michelle Bridges: “Come and see my farm“.

A FURORE erupted in farming circles last week when fitness trainer Michelle Bridges reignited the inflammatory debate on ‘ag-gag’ laws with a column in the Sun Herald.

Now a group of young Aussie farmers wants to “open the gate”, inviting Ms Bridges on a journey to see how they farm.

Ms Bridges’ opinion piece called for Australian consumers to resist the introduction of US-style ag-gag legislation which would restrict filming of animal production by activists. In response, the Australian Farm Institute (AFI) published an open letter asking Ms Bridges if she would mind having cameras set up in her own home.

Ms Bridges defended her column, posting this on Facebook days later:

“Aussie farmers – I have huge respect for what you do and realise the majority of the industry do the right thing. But I do believe that those who don’t should be held accountable.

“My article takes a stance against proposed new laws that I believe are unjust. It does not condone, encourage or endorse illegal activity.”

Regardless, the AFI open letter went viral, spawning countless tweets and Facebook posts and generating unprecedented online traffic. Amongst the understandable outrage, a clear trend emerged: farmers were keen not to defend the industry but to educate people disconnected from the reality of agricultural production.

Art4Agriculture Young Farming Champion Hannah Barber is one of many producers who’ve extended an invitation to Ms Bridges to share their stories.

 

An open invitation

 

Dear Ms Bridges,

My name is Hannah Barber and I am lucky enough to have been brought up on the family farm. We have now been proudly producing sheep, beef cattle and crops to feed and clothe Australian families for over 100 years.

After being thrown into the melting pot of people from different backgrounds at school and in the wider community I realised that I had taken for granted people’s connection to agriculture. I realised that not all people had the opportunities to have a connection to the land and farming and my childhood was unique and special.

I have now been lucky enough to be selected to represent the cattle and sheep industry with 40 other young people from the grains, wool, cotton and dairy industries in the Art4Agriculture Young Farming Champion’s program. These 40 young people are either proud to farm or have careers in the exciting, innovative and dynamic sector that is Australian agriculture.

Part of the reason I applied for the program was that it gave me multiple opportunities to provide others with the connection I have with farms and farmers, families and communities who grow the clothes they wear and food they eat.

When I read your article in the Sydney Morning Herald Lifestyle Section – “It’s time to take a stand over proposed “ag-gag” laws” – (by the way, I am confident you didn’t mean to infer that you supported the rights of people to break into farms) I saw a wonderful opportunity to literally take you on a journey to share my farming experiences.

I would like to extend an invitation for you to join me on a road trip to visit my family farm and those of some of my fellow Young Farming Champions to see how our animals are raised and how we get them ethically from paddock to plate (and everywhere else in between). After all, the fresh, healthy food you promote for fitness, health and weight management is grown by Australian farming families, like ours.

From my cattle in Parkes, you could maybe then visit Tom Tourle’s sheep farm in Dubbo, Georgia Clark’s chooks at Lake Macquarie and Prue Capp’s horses in the Hunter Valley.

The farmers who help put the cheese on your crackers Tom Pearce and Andrew D’Arcy could show us around their dairies in the home of cheese itself, Bega, and we’d better also drop in on Richie Quigley and Ben Egan growing the cotton for our socks out in the beautiful Macquarie Valley.

After who wouldn’t want to meet pin up boy Ben Egan

As young farming champions we are also scientists studying in various fields for our PhDs, we are agronomists, nutritionists, vets and rural entrepreneurs to name but a few. We are nurturers and environmentalists. In fact there is a career and a role for you in agriculture from A to Z.

My Mum also makes some mean scones too, so I suggest you plan to stay for smoko.

On behalf of the Art4Agriculture Young Farming Champions I look forward to hearing from you.

Hannah Barber

– Cattle and Sheep Industry Young Farming Champion